A look at SFMOMA (San Francisco Museum of Modern Art) – 2022

As some of you might know, I live in San Francisco. Small city but lot to do and this first Thursday of the year I went to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art. I took some snaps of some of the pieces that hit me and I wanted to share them with you and what drew me in. Most of the photos are from the Barber and Gerson Bakar Galleries, which was the highlight of the night. The collection of artists in this form of (imo) truly modern times art were outstanding and I wish I could spend more time in the place. It was absolutely wonderful. So without further ado, let’s check out a museum from a city you probably don’t live in.

SFMOMA (January – 2022)

This piece was fantastic. Two motors slowly opened and closed wires while the center dripped soap into a wood bowl at the bottom. When the wires were all aligned, the bubbles trickled with an almost bug like effect but when they opened, the reflection of the surrounding lighting on the giant bubble was mesmerizing. I stood at this one the longest that night for I wanted to see the reflection a little longer. It always felt like it took longer for the piece to open and than close. Oh the closing always came quickly. I wanted one more moment with the reflecting bubble..

Different that most at the museum. This one had us queuing in line for 15 minutes to enter a bland dark bridge. From the outside panels, a viewer saw nothing but black shapes. but entering the hallway and turning around, the world opened up in wonderful colorful glass. I don’t know how the paint worked, but from the outside it really looked black, no sign of color at all. It was beautiful to see from the other side. IMO, worth the wait in line.

I liked these 3 paintings because it really looked like folded paper textures. Plus to be able to emulate the textures with wonderful hues and gradients that popped on the black wall, it was pleasant for my eyes to observe.

Entrance Wall
Got a real lo-fi / VHS effect from these two.

I think these were photographs of a CRT. I forgot to read the sign. Could be hand painted for all I know. Still… Art in the static.


In addition to this collection, I also saw the collection of abstract artist Joan Mitchell. It was her last night at the museum, so tonight was kind of a sending off. I’m not a big fan of her abstract or abstract in general but here’s a few that caught my eye.


On the top floor there’s an interesting mix of mediums; sounds, water, technology, etc. I had seen it last year but this time I got a few photos.

These motherboards with screens (that looked a lot like a bunch of pagers connected to each other) randomly outputting phrases or words on a synced clock. It seemed like non-sense to me but I liked the idea of a wall of lo-fi screens with a message to decrypt.

This was a bed of dry-ice or some kind of fog machine under light in a completely pitch-black room. People were crowding around it pushing wind into it to form new shapes. I even snagged a photo of a shadow that was my own contribution to the art scene (below):


On the bottom floor there was a collection of early 1900s modern art. The likes of Paul Klee, Warhol, Frida, etc; A lot of it was familiar but I had never put a name to the picture. We almost left without visit it because it was so tucked in the back.

This one really spoke to me because it felt like a creepy pasta; A ridged moving box in a blood stained world.

I see the Golden Gate Bridge within.
The Industrial past.

I believe this one was called the waiting room. I loved how folded the person in the chair is and how detailed the outside world was to the darkness they lived in. Almost like a “this is fine” meme somewhere in it.

It wouldn’t be an art museum without a solid color painting. On another wall in this room was 3 panels of pure white canvas. I do like this azure blue though, it’s pretty on the eyes and I was impressed that as I got closer there was actually texture from the paint lifting off the canvas.

Some genuine Andy Warhol.

The man and the woman on the floor were real but the pidgins were made of found wire, newspapers and other other trash. It was fooling to the eye first walking into the room. I likes the composition of the girl sitting, real hipster moment..


That about wraps it up. I love going to museums any chance I can, and I am happy to share my thoughts and interests with those who read. If you like this kind of thing, let me know of Twitter.

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